Charlie Hewitt:

Bibliography

Grants and Awards

Hewitt often speaks of his desire to portray "things," or "stuff" in his art. In speaking of his painting, he has said, "When I paint a form, it's real to me. It actually exists the painting as if it is a say, a rope or a chain. This statement is amply demonstrated, for instance, by just one of his motifs: the appearance of brawny hands, usually grasping tools. The viewer may be reminded of how often Rembrandt depicted hands (one of the most difficult problems in draftsmanship), and how their gestures reveal deeply human qualities. This physical reality -- both of the object and the representation of it -- is a major characteristic of Hewitt's prints.
From The Graphic Work of Charlie Hewitt, by Mark H.C. Bessire

Publications

Hewitt is an extremely talented, energetic and physical printmaker. He cannot sit still and is compelled to work, to draw and carve. For Hewitt, the process of beginning and developing an image and the collaborative nature of printmaking, are what make the medium so appealing. Hewitt's work complements the collection at the Bates College Museum of Art because it is critically and historically important, particularly for a teaching museum with a collection focusing on prints.
From The Graphic Work of Charlie Hewitt, by Mark H.C. Bessire